‘Glenworth’ on Berry Mountain set to be auctioned

A piece of South Coast history could fetch in excess of $4 million. 

‘Glenworth’ is in a unique location on Berry Mountain, its grounds set upon a broad raised flat above the escarpment overlooking Berry and beyond to the sea.

The date of construction of Glenworth’s Victorian two-storey house and associated out-buildings is estimated to be circa 1880 by James Wilson, the first mayor of Berry.

Do you have an interesting real estate story that could be featured in an upcoming edition? Please email brendan.crabb@fairfaxmedia.com.au with details.

Do you have an interesting real estate story that could be featured in an upcoming edition? Please email brendan.crabb@fairfaxmedia.com.au with details.

The 98.8 acre property up for sale features extensive outbuildings and sufficient shedding to store all forms of farm machinery. 

It will be auctioned on November 15. 

Selling agent, Ray White Gerringong principal Neil Campbell said it was difficult to suggest a price guide, but estimated it could be “north of $4 million”. 

The house is set upon a foundation of locally cut sandstone flagstones, with walls constructed in solid masonry using handmade bricks moulded from clay dug from a pit at the top of the property, and fired in a kiln behind the house. 

The home contains six bedrooms and three bathrooms. Also included is a second dwelling, previously a caretaker’s cottage.

The property upon which Glenworth was built was originally granted to John Freer on August 23, 1861, for the cost of £1 per acre.

Mr Freer had been convicted in 1847 to be transported to the colony for seven years, for the robbery of a goods train in Camden town.

James Wilson purchased the land from Mr Freer in 1873, to establish the property that he named ‘Glenworth’.

He had arrived in the colony from Ireland in 1849 and became a leading citizen in the town of Broughton Creek (renamed Berry in 1889).

He became the first mayor of Broughton Creek in 1868. 

Mr Wilson had a keen interest in farming, and Glenworth was described as a model farm. 

The Victorian two-storey home was built in about 1880 by James Wilson. Pictured is a Wilson family picnic at the property, circa the 1890s. Pictures: Supplied

The Victorian two-storey home was built in about 1880 by James Wilson. Pictured is a Wilson family picnic at the property, circa the 1890s. Pictures: Supplied

After his death in 1901, the property passed through several hands, including being repurchased by his son, also named James Wilson.

Bruce Frecker and his father Eric purchased the 900-acre property in 1950, and later enlarged it with the acquisition of 300 acres across the road. 

The property’s dairy had been operated by Cecil Parker since 1948, a job he continued until it was closed in the 1980s. 

Glenworth has been held by Bruce Frecker and his family for 67 years.

Over the years, the Freckers have sold off allotments of approximately 40-hectare lots each at the site. 

Mr Campbell said this current sale was of the remaining two lots they owned. 

The property’s address is available on request. 

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