Albion Park High grow bush tucker

Albion Park High School Students Mason Ayling and Jenaya Nozza explore some of the country’s indigenous plants. Picture Eliza Winkler

Albion Park High School Students Mason Ayling and Jenaya Nozza explore some of the country’s indigenous plants. Picture Eliza Winkler

BUSHTUCKER and indigenous plants are the new green science for Albion Park High School students.

As part of the school’s Live Local, Think Global program, Albion Park High School students are learning in depth about traditional plants used by Aboriginal people for nutritious food throughout the generations.

The program introduces students to various plant species and will be planted in the school’s soon-to-be Bush tucker Garden.

Science and agriculture teacher Mehdi Hassanpour said a bush tucker garden would teach the students about environmental issues as well as history.

“We look at various indigenous plant species but with a different perspective,” Mr Hassanpour said.

“We always talk about bush tucker but this gives us a chance to physically explore the species and discuss how in the old days the Aboriginal people consumed these as a source of food.

“We currently have located several different species and are still looking for others, and we are going to plant them in the school ground garden.”

Mr Hassanpour said the school had invited Michael Connor from Wollongong Botanical Gardens to speak with the students about different species and help them locate more endangered plants to grow in the school garden.  

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