Mother's love for teenage daughter leads to world first cancer research

Community commitment: Tasha Armour was recognised for her Outstanding Commitment to the Community by founding Rare Ovarian Cancer Inc and initiating world first research. Picture: Greg Ellis.
Community commitment: Tasha Armour was recognised for her Outstanding Commitment to the Community by founding Rare Ovarian Cancer Inc and initiating world first research. Picture: Greg Ellis.

The winner of the Outstanding Commitment to the Community Award at the 2020 Illawarra Women In Business Awards was recognised after showing what the power of love for a child can achieve.

Tasha Armour was acknowledged for her work in the community since founding Rare Ovarian Cancer Inc in 2018.

She held back tears as she spoke of how her 16 year old daughter was diagnosed with the very rare cancer in 2016. And recalled how little information there was at the time.

"To be told your child has cancer, I fail to put into words that pain," she said.

"To then be told that there is no research, well cancer you picked the wrong family if you thought we would take that answer.

"Today I proudly share with you all that myself along with my amazing team at ROC Inc have initiated and created the world's first and largest research for Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumor.

"This ovarian cancer affects babies as young as four months old to menopausal women.

"The 1st of July 2020 is the first time ever in Australia's history that JGCT has received Federal funding from the National Medical Research Future Fund for vital research.

"This award belongs to everyone who has helped us create more awareness for ovarian cancer, its symptoms and support research to save lives.

"Without the support of my family, my friends, researchers, the community and the amazing team we have at ROC Inc none of this would be possible.

"My passion came from my love. When we all came together we created hope for the future".

Vi Blazevska, of ANZ Commercial Banking, said the Outstanding Commitment to the Community category was getting harder to judge every year because there are so many people and businesses doing great things in the Illawarra community.

But Ms Blazevska said Mrs Armour was chosen as this year's winner for the way she refused to accept there were no scientific answers and through sheer determination started ROC Inc as a registered charity in 2018.

She said in doing so she not only raised money for research into finding a treatment and potentially a cure.

But also raise awareness about the symptoms for other families to look out for.

Mrs Armour recruited members of the community to join the board and in the last two years has raised more than $70,000 through community events and started a Facebook group with more than 3000 followers.

Mrs Armour has also written many grant applications and has actively lobbied politicans about the need to fund research.

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This story Mother's love for teenage daughter leads to world first cancer research first appeared on Illawarra Mercury.