Expert tips to warm up safely in winter

Kiama's deputy captain Terry Dryburgh and captain Peter Mitchell. The station will be open to the public on Saturday. Picture: ALBEY BOND

Kiama's deputy captain Terry Dryburgh and captain Peter Mitchell. The station will be open to the public on Saturday. Picture: ALBEY BOND

AFTER the annual open day was cancelled last year due to tornado damage, Kiama residents can once again meet their area's firefighters, learn about fire safety and check out a fire truck this Saturday.

Fire & Rescue NSW will host its annual open day on Saturday, May 17, with fire stations throughout the state opening their doors to give visitors a glimpse into the service.

Kiama Fire Station will be open from 10am-2pm.

Those attending can learn about FRNSW, meet Kiama's firefighters, learn about fire safety, check out a fire truck and watch a fire safety demonstration.

Kiama Fire Station captain Peter Mitchell said the event would return to Kiama after last year's absence, and encouraged families to attend and learn more about fire prevention.

"We didn't have an open day last year because of the tornado damage and we didn't have a roof," he said.

"We now have a roof and new doors."

He said the Kiama event usually drew one of the larger crowds of any station in the Illawarra.

"We typically get 300 to 400 people, depending on the weather."

The free activities will include firefighting demonstrations, station tours and fire safety presentations.

Firefighters will also provide advice on installing and maintaining smoke alarms, changing smoke alarm batteries and preparing a home fire escape plan.

Children will be able to see fire engines and firefighting equipment up close.

"We let the children inspect the fire engines, and we have firefighters on hand to answer questions," Mr Mitchell said.

The day coincides with the launch of FRNSW's Winter Fire Safety Campaign.

"With winter approaching, open day is a timely opportunity to talk to the experts about home fire safety," Mr Mitchell said.

"Winter is the worst time of the year for home fires, with 60 per cent of all house fires occurring in the cooler months of May to September."

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